Reading and Reception Studies Seminar 

 

A seminar organized by the Research Project on the Reception of British and Irish Authors in Europe (RBAE)

 

Convenor: Dr Elinor Shaffer FBA

Research Project Director and Senior Research Fellow

Institute of Modern Languages Research (IMLR), University of London

 

Topics relating to reading and reception studies are considered in this seminar, which takes place at University College London (please note the new location) and Clare Hall, Cambridge, under the auspices of the RBAE Research Project. The informal sessions consider both critical approaches (all varieties of reader-response theory and critical reception in books, periodicals and the work of other authors) and material approaches (history-of-the-book topics relating to publication, distribution and circulation). Translation is also a major concern. Case studies of all kinds are welcome. The seminar is also hospitable to those working on European authors in Britain. Papers need not be confined to Europe. There will be opportunities to publish and to contribute to the Research Project, to give a paper to a seminar, or simply to air ideas and discuss work-in-progress with other interested parties.

 

Meetings are held on Tuesdays from 5.30-7.30 pm, in Foster Court, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT, unless otherwise indicated. Anyone interested in participating should contact the Convenor at the above address. Other Colloquia and Seminars are held in Cambridge (indicated in green), the IMLR, and at European venues.

 

Listed below are also events organized by the IMLR Working Group for the Reception of German/Austrian/Swiss Literature in Britain, of which Dr Shaffer is convenor.

 

RBAE Seminars are now held at University College London in collaboration with UCL Arts & Humanities;

IMLR Lectures are held in Senate House.

 

Directions and maps for University College London can be found here.

 

Nearest underground stations for:

University College: Euston Square (Circle, Hammersmith & City, and Metropolitan lines) and Warren Street (Victoria line and Northern line, Charing Cross branch)

Senate House: Russell Square (Piccadilly line) and Goodge Street (Northern line, Charing Cross branch);

 

All are welcome!

 

Spring Term 2014

(Term 2)

 

Thursday, 16 January, 5.30 – 7.30pm
Working Group for the Reception of German/Austrian/Swiss Literature Lecture

Institute of Modern Languages Research

Room 34, ground floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1
Dr Giles Whiteley (Stockholm)
Uncanny Echoes: Schelling’s Influence on Nineteenth-Century English Literature’

 

Tuesday, 4 February, 5.30-7.30 pm
G24, Foster Court, University College London, Malet Place, WC1
Dr Anne Lewis (Birkbeck)

Intermedial Influence and Reception: Marivaux’s La Vie de Marianne

 

Tuesday, 25 February, 5.30-7.30 pm

G24, Foster Court, University College London, Malet Place, WC1

Professor Patrick Pollard (Birkbeck)

‘When Heaven Meets Hell: William Blake and André Gide’

 

Thursday, 13 March, 5.30-7.30 pm

The Grant Museum of Zoology, University College London, 21 University Street, London WC1

Dr Carolyn Burdett (Birkbeck) 

Shareability and Contagion: Psychology and Aesthetics at the fin de siècle

 

 

--------------

 

Autumn Term 2013

(Term 1)

 

Thursday, 10 October, 5.30 for 6.00-8.00 pm
Working Group for the Reception of German/Austrian/Swiss Literature Lecture

Institute of Modern Languages Research

Room 21a, ground floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1
Professor Nicholas Saul (Durham)
AnthropophagyKüssen, Beißen, Schlürfen: Döblin and the Vampire Tradition’

 

Tuesday, 22 October, 5.30-7.30 pm
The Old Refectory, South Cloisters, University College London, Gower Street, WC1
British Comparative Literature Association (BCLA) Graduate Autumn Reception

sponsored by the BCLA, RBAE and UCL

 

Tuesday, 19 November, 5.30-7.30 pm
G31, Foster Court, University College London, Gower Street WC1
Dr Sibylle Erle (Bishop Grosseteste University Lincoln)
Phrenology through the Eyes of the Physiognomist: Character in the Romantic Period